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My Environmental News page is a compelling source for breaking news, analysis, and feature stories on environmental issues.

Environmental News from Science Daily

Boilers are a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. In a recent study, researchers developed a method to convert CO2 emissions from small boilers into methane, which makes use of an optimized reactor design that evenly distributes the CO2 feed. This, in turn, results in significantly lower temperature increments and a boost in methane production. This innovative technique could pave the way for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
While most organisms have biological clocks synchronized with the day-night cycle (circadian rhythms), marine animals in tidal areas have also developed circatidal rhythms to align with the tidal cycle. Comparing the activity and genetic expression of snails from tidal and non-tidal areas, researchers demonstrate that circatidal rhythms develop as snails adapt to tidal environments. These findings highlight the flexibility of biological clocks, enabling organisms to adjust their rhythms according to the environment.
By analyzing the dynamics of 12 back-to-back explosions that happened in 2018, researchers describe a new type of volcanic eruption mechanism. The explosions were driven by sudden pressure increases as the ground collapsed, which blasted plumes of rock fragments and hot gas into the air, much like a classic stomp-rocket toy.
An evolutionary biologist reports evidence of repeatable evolution in populations of stick insects.
Entomologists have solved the 250-year-old origin puzzle of the most prevalent indoor urban pest insect on the planet: the German cockroach. The team's research findings, representing the genomic analyses of over 280 specimens from 17 countries and six continents, show that this species evolved some 2,100 years ago from an outdoor-living species in Asia.
Mice administered raw milk samples from dairy cows infected with H5N1 influenza experienced high virus levels in their respiratory organs and lower virus levels in other vital organs, according to new findings. The results suggest that consumption of raw milk by animals poses a risk for H5N1 infection and raises questions about its potential risk in humans.
Researchers have outlined a way to manipulate water molecules to make CO2R more efficient, with the ultimate goal of creating a clean energy loop. Through their new method, the team was able to perform CO2R with nearly 100% efficiency under mildly acidic conditions, using either gold or zinc as catalysts.
Researchers have developed a new technique to view living mammalian cells. The team used a powerful laser, called a soft X-ray free electron laser, to emit ultrafast pulses of illumination at the speed of femtoseconds, or quadrillionths of a second. With this they could capture images of carbon-based structures in living cells for the first time, before the soft X-ray radiation damaged them.
Caterpillars respond defensively to electric fields similar to those emitted by their natural predators, scientists have found.

Environmental News from EPA

Biden-Harris Administration Announces $2.79 Million in Brownfield Grants Through Investing in America Agenda to Rehabilitate and Revitalize Communities in LouisianaFunded by $1.5 billion investment into Brownfields sites from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to address legacy pollution, advance environmental justice, and create healthier communitiesDALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $2.79 million in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Louisiana while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the cities of Alexandria, Bogalusa and Baker and the Rapides Area Planning Commission for $2.79 million in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “This announcement is a significant step toward revitalizing the community and addressing long-standing environmental and economic challenges. This grant will fund comprehensive environmental site assessments and support the development of cleanup plans, site reuse assessments, a revitalization plan, and a market study, alongside robust community engagement efforts. I was proud to help craft and vote for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law which is delivering unprecedented support to our state. This grant is moving environmental justice forward, promises substantial economic revitalization and improved public health for the residents of Baker, and is fostering a brighter, more sustainable future,” said Congressman Troy A. Carter, Sr. (LA-02).“Louisiana’s many successful Brownfields programs show the variety of ways big cities and small towns can leverage this funding to spur revitalization by cleaning up long-standing sources of contamination,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “Across the state, parishes and cities are making great investments for their residents with EPA’s Brownfields funding.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThese Louisiana organizations have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.· The city of Alexandria has been selected for a $1,290,550 Brownfields Cleanup Grant for the 1-acre former Rush's Cleaners site at 210 Bolton Avenue, which is contaminated with volatile organic contaminants from leaking equipment and associated piping, and improper storage and disposal. Grant funds also will be used to update the city's existing Community Involvement Plan, update the brownfield project website, and conduct other community engagement activities.· The city of Baker will receive a $500,000 for a Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 15 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and evaluate additional sites, prepare four cleanup plans, conduct two site reuse assessments, prepare one revitalization plan and one market study, conduct two visioning sessions, prepare a Community Involvement Plan, and support community engagement. Priority sites include a vacant commercial strip mall and a former filling station and tire shop.· The city of Bogalusa will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 15 Phase I and eight Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, prepare six cleanup plans and one revitalization plan, conduct two site reuse assessments, conduct three visioning sessions, and support other community engagement activities. The grant will target the Poplas Neighborhood, the Terrace Neighborhood, and Richardson Town. Priority sites include seven downtown storefront properties in a state of disrepair and a former restaurant and bar.· The Rapides Area Planning Commission will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 14 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, develop three cleanup plans and one site reuse plan, and support community engagement activities, including the development of a Community Involvement Plan. The target area for this grant is the city of Pineville's Downtown Neighborhood, including a former dry cleaning facility on Main Street, the former Huey P. Long Charity Hospital site, and a former gas station located on Main Street.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $500,000 from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Raton, New Mexico, while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the city of Raton for a Brownfields Community-wide Assessment Grant to conduct 12 Phase I and five Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, prepare cleanup and reuse plans for priority sites and up to six additional sites, and conduct community engagement activities. Priority sites include a nearly 1-acre former family-run market, a 214.5-acre former horse-racing track, and a 6.6-acre former hospital site.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “EPA’s Brownfields funding helps communities of all sizes deal with the environmental and economic burden of abandoned, contaminated properties,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “This grant from President Biden’s historic Investing in America agenda will give Raton a boost to clean up these sites and revitalize their environment while spurring more economic development.”“I’m proud to welcome this important investment that will help clean up abandoned facilities that leak toxic waste and transform them into assets to the community,” said U.S. Senator Ben Ray Luján (NM). “This funding is a win-win for New Mexico by helping the City of Raton enjoy cleaner air and a safer environment while expanding economic opportunities through renovations of these deserted properties.”"This $500,000 investment in Raton for brownfield assessment and cleanup preparation will be welcomed by all local residents,” said Rep. Leger Fernández (NM-03). “This investment, which was made possible by our Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, is a tremendous opportunity for our community to turn abandoned and oftentimes environmentally hazardous sites into thriving business hubs and vibrant community spaces. I look forward to seeing Raton flourish as a result of this funding."  Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $4 million in grants from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Arkansas while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment and the Southwest Arkansas Planning and Development District for more than $3 million total in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. In addition, EPA is announcing $1 million in supplemental funding to existing, high-performing Brownfields RLF Grant Programs to help expedite their continued work at sites in Arkansas.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “The Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment and Southwest Arkansas Planning and Development District have impressive records of getting the most out of Brownfields funding by effectively investing in assessment and cleanup efforts to benefit both urban and rural areas,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “These historic funding amounts from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda will help revitalize more properties and clean up more neighborhoods.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Arkansas have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment has been selected to receive $1 million 15 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to develop five cleanup plans and conduct community engagement activities. Priority sites include five small vacant and dilapidated commercial and residential buildings in downtown Earle; a former auto repair site in the West Memphis Broadway Corridor, and a fire station, a former bulk oil and chemical distribution facility, and the Booker Arts Magnet School in East Little Rock.Southwest Arkansas Planning and Development District, Inc., is receiving $2 million to cleanup wing of the former Warner Brown Hospital in the city of El Dorado. The 2.7-acre cleanup site operated as a hospital and has been vacant since 2015. It is contaminated with heavy metals and inorganic contaminants. Grant funds also will be used to develop a Community Involvement Plan and conduct community engagement activities. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramEPA is announcing $1 million in non-competitive supplemental funding to successful existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant programs that have already achieved success in their work to clean up and redevelop brownfield sites. RLF Grants provide funding for recipients to offer loans and subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. The funding announced today will help communities continue to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfield sites. Pulaski County Brownfields Program has been selected to receive $1 million to help underserved areas in Pulaski County. The RLF program has successfully made loans or subgrants leading to 19 cleanup projects that are either completed or in progress. Potential projects highlighted for use of the BIL funding include the former hotel and job training site and the Godsey Cleaners. The BIL funding will extend the capacity of the program to provide funding for more cleanups in the most underserved areas in Pulaski County.To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.### 
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $1,333,883 from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Cherokee Nation while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the Cherokee Nation for a Brownfields Community-wide Assessment Grant to conduct 25 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to prepare three cleanup plans and one reuse plan and to support community engagement activities. Priority sites include open fields with vegetation in Skiatook, a 2.4-acre developed site with several structures in Bartlesville, the historic Citizen's Bank building and former jail in Marble City, and a 15-acre undeveloped site near a former cold storage plant in Stilwell.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “The Cherokee Nation continues its impressive work to clean up abandoned and contaminated properties to create healthy neighborhoods for their citizens,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “Historic funding amounts from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda are providing more opportunities for Tribes to invest in their own lands, environment, and well-being.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) will receive $18,900,000 to assess the extent of emerging contaminants such as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in public water systems and disadvantaged communities and implement measures to protect communities from these dangerous chemicals. The funding comes from President Biden’s historic Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which has addressed significant pollution issues across the nation. “Clean, safe drinking water is something every person in New Mexico deserves,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “With this funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the New Mexico Environment Department will be able to take crucial steps to safeguard New Mexico’s drinking water from PFAS and other emerging contaminants.” "Contamination and pollution from forever chemicals like PFAS threaten clean drinking water supplies that New Mexico communities depend upon. I am proud to welcome $18.9 million that we secured through the Infrastructure Law to ramp up New Mexico's urgent efforts to detect pollution and protect our precious water resources from PFAS and other emerging contaminants,” said U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich.“I’m proud to welcome this pivotal investment of more than $18 million from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to help New Mexico communities safeguard themselves from PFAS,” said U.S. Senator Ben Ray Luján. “This funding will help examine PFAS levels across the state and implement remediation and mitigation methods to help protect New Mexico's public water system while helping educate New Mexicans on the public health and environmental risks that these chemicals cause."“Combating per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, also known as forever chemicals or PFAS, in our public water systems is essential to provide safe water for communities in New Mexico," said Rep. Melanie Stansbury (NM-01). "Under the Biden Administration, the EPA is working quickly to end the decades of destructive, and sometimes, deadly practices by corporate polluters, and the $18.9 million coming to our state will continue the progress of cleaning up our water systems. New Mexicans know water is life, and they also know the state's Democratic leaders are dedicated to cleaning the water supply for generations to come.”“When clean water flows, New Mexico grows,” said Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (NM-03). “This $18.9 million EPA award is an investment in the health and safety of New Mexico’s residents. The testing and engineering for PFAS remediation were exactly the kind of projects we envisioned when we passed the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. The Biden Administration knows these projects are essential to protect clean water in our state and help communities who need it most.”NMED will perform sampling of public water systems to assess the extent of PFAS contamination throughout the state. During the sampling process, which the NMED anticipates will take two years to complete, the state will evaluate communities to determine which areas need critical assistance. The NMED will also plan and coordinate outreach efforts for communities during this time. Remediation and mitigation efforts will begin once sampling and evaluation is complete, with an emphasis on small and disadvantaged communities. This funding has a lifespan of five years, with the opportunity for additional funding throughout this time. The five-year workplan includes the identification of PFAS and other emerging contaminants in public water systems, removing all hazardous substances from drinking water sources, and educating communities on how emerging contaminates threaten public health and the environment. The final phase of this funding will be the implementation of plans that assist water systems in maintaining clean water compliance and building resiliency for long-term sustainability.PFAS are a group of manufactured chemicals that have been used in industry and consumer products since the 1940s. Exposure to certain PFAS over a long period of time pose a significant public health risk. The economic and environmental impact of PFAS has already been felt in New Mexico and continues to have an impact nationwide. Through some preliminary testing PFAS has been detected in multiple locations across the state. This funding will allow for more research into the presence of PFAS and other contaminants in source and drinking water. Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.
WASHINGTON – Today, May 23, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Justice announced a settlement valued at over $310 million with Norfolk Southern Railway Company holding the company accountable for addressing and paying for the damage caused by the Feb. 3, 2023 train derailment in East Palestine, Ohio. If the settlement is approved by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, Norfolk Southern will be required to take measures to improve rail safety, pay for health monitoring and mental health services for the surrounding communities, fund long-term environmental monitoring, pay a $15 million civil penalty, and take other actions to protect nearby waterways and drinking water resources. Together with other response costs and rail safety enhancements, Norfolk Southern estimates that it will spend more than $1 billion to address the contamination and other harms caused by the East Palestine derailment and improve rail safety and operations.In the hours following the derailment, EPA personnel arrived on site, and they have remained there to ensure that the people of East Palestine are protected and have the most up-to-date information. In those early days, EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan promised that Norfolk Southern would be held accountable for its actions. Since then, as EPA and DOJ pursued a strong enforcement action to deliver on that commitment, EPA has continued to stay engaged in the community, directing cleanup activities, collecting air, water and soil samples, and participating in community meetings. The Administration has led a robust, multi-agency effort—including the Department of Transportation, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Department of Health and Human Services—to fulfill President Biden’s commitment to “supporting the people of East Palestine and all those affected in surrounding areas of Ohio and Pennsylvania every step of the way.”“No community should have to experience the trauma inflicted upon the residents of East Palestine,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why President Biden pledged from the beginning that his Administration would stand with the community every step of the way. Today’s enforcement action delivers on this commitment, ensures the cleanup is paid for by the company, and helps prevent another disaster like this from happening again. Because of this settlement, residents and first responders will have greater access to health services, trains will be safer and waterways will be cleaner.”“The President issued an executive order which promised to address the disaster’s long-term effects and to hold Norfolk Southern responsible for its train derailing and the burning of hazardous chemicals in East Palestine. This settlement helps fulfill that promise,” said Acting Associate Attorney General Benjamin C. Mizer. “Importantly, those who will most directly benefit from this settlement are those who were most directly affected by the disaster. And the rail safety commitments will help prevent future catastrophic railway events.”Today’s settlement follows a complaint filed by the United States against Norfolk Southern in March 2023 for unlawful discharges of pollutants and hazardous substances caused by the train derailment. In February 2023, EPA issued a unilateral administrative order, holding Norfolk Southern accountable for the damage done to the community. The order required cleanup of spilled substances and impacted soils, as well as payment of all costs to the U.S. government. EPA also issued an order under the Clean Water Act to clean up oil spilled into the surrounding waterways. Since then, EPA has been directing and overseeing the extensive cleanup activities. In total, Norfolk Southern estimates that it will spend more than $1 billion to address the contamination caused by the East Palestine derailment and improve rail safety and operations, which includes this settlement with the United States valued at over $310 million, as well as around $780 million in environmental response costs incurred by Norfolk Southern. Norfolk Southern has estimated its costs since the derailment will exceed $200 million in rail safety enhancements, including those required by this settlement.To help ensure that no community goes through what East Palestine residents have faced, the settlement also requires Norfolk Southern to improve coordination with government officials and other stakeholders during emergency responses. Specifically, Norfolk Southern will create and adopt a procedure for coordinating with first responders and government officials, where appropriate, before restoring and reopening tracks for use after a derailment involving spilled hazardous material. Norfolk Southern will also create and adopt a procedure for coordinating with government officials and other stakeholders in advance of any vent and burn proposed by the company.Under the settlement, Norfolk Southern has agreed to:Spend an estimated $235 million for all past and future costs, so that cleanup efforts can continue and the company, rather than taxpayers, covers the cost.Pay a $15 million civil penalty to resolve the alleged violations of the Clean Water Act.Pay $25 million for a 20-year community health program that includes medical monitoring for qualified individuals and mental health services for individuals residing in affected counties – including those in Pennsylvania – as well as first responders who worked at the site, and a community facilitation plan to assist community members in using the benefits of the program.Spend approximately $15 million to implement long-term monitoring of groundwater and surface water for a period of 10 years.Pay $15 million for a private drinking water monitoring fund that will continue the existing private drinking water well monitoring program for 10 years.Implement a “waterways remediation plan,” with an estimated budget of $6 million, for projects in Leslie Run and Sulphur Run that will prioritize addressing historical pollution, reducing non-point source pollution through infrastructure upgrades and stormwater management projects, and restoring aquatic and riparian habitat.Pay $175,000 for natural resource damages, to be used by the United States to restore, rehabilitate, replace, or acquire the equivalent of the natural resources injured as a result of the derailment. In addition, the consent decree requires Norfolk Southern to undertake projects to improve the safety of transporting hazardous materials by rail, which will include installation of additional devices to detect overheated wheel bearings early enough to prevent derailments like the one that happened in East Palestine. All told, Norfolk Southern has estimated its costs dating from the derailment will exceed $200 million in rail safety enhancements.The proposed settlement, lodged in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, is subject to a minimum 30-day public comment period and final court approval. The details of today’s settlement are available on the Justice Department’s website.Additional BackgroundEPA is committed to protecting the health and safety of East Palestine and surrounding communities. EPA personnel have been on site since the initial hours of the train derailment, and the agency continues to provide residents the most up-to-date information via the website, welcome center, community meetings, newsletters and more. Immediately following the train derailment, EPA established a 24/7 air monitoring and sampling network. EPA also began coordinating with state and local officials to monitor environmental impacts on the community. Over the course of the response, EPA has collected over 115 million air monitoring data points and over 45,000 air, water and soil samples, giving the agency confidence in the safety of air, water and soil in the community. Since the evacuation was lifted, no sustained chemicals of concern have been found in the air.To date, more than 177,000 tons of contaminated soil and more than 69 million gallons of wastewater have been removed from the community and work continues to remove contamination from area creeks and soil sampling at the derailment site to ensure all contamination has been remediated.
WASHINGTON – Today, May 24, the Friday before the Memorial Day weekend, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, along with the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention, is recognizing the 16th annual “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage Americans to take a few simple steps to protect their skin and eye health while outdoors. Overexposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun can increase the risk of developing skin cancer and cataracts, so it is important to be aware of the strength of the sun’s UV rays and take simple steps to protect your skin and eyes while outdoors. “Remember to protect your skin and eyes from UV rays before you go outdoors,” said Joseph Goffman, Assistant Administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation. “Don’t Fry Day is a great annual reminder of the importance of sun safety, and you can use the EPA’s UV Index app to get the UV forecast for your location and tips on how to be sun safe.”  Almost 20% of Americans will develop skin cancer. Since many skin cancer cases are caused by overexposure to UV radiation, protecting your skin outdoors is an important step to reducing your skin cancer risk. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2024, more than 100,600 new cases of invasive melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, will be diagnosed in the United States. This is approximately 3,000 more cases than were estimated in 2023.All people are equally at risk of eye damage and developing cataracts, but some people may be at greater risk of contracting skin cancer depending on the color of their skin, a history of blistering sunburns in early childhood, the presence of many moles, or a family history of skin cancer. Also, although sun safety is especially important in summer when we spend more time outdoors, UV can be high throughout the year depending on factors such as location, elevation, and reflective surfaces like sand and snow. The EPA, the National Weather Service, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work together to make the UV Index forecast available in the United States. The EPA’s UV Index app (search for the EPA’s UV Index in the App Store and on Google Play) is a convenient tool to let you know the strength of the sun’s skin cancer-causing UV rays. The app gives daily and hourly UV intensity forecasts for your location, provides recommendations on sun safety, and is also available in Spanish. Reduce your risk of skin cancer and eye damage by remembering to:SLIP! – Slip on a long-sleeved shirt or other clothing that covers your skin.SLOP! – Slop on a handful of sunscreen with sun protection factor 15 or higher, and re-apply every two hours, or sooner if in the water.SLAP! – Slap on a broad-brimmed hat to cover the back of your neck and the tips of your ears.WRAP! – Wrap on a pair of sunglasses. The kind that wrap around the sides of your face provide more sun protection.Avoid tanning beds and minimize sunbathing.Check the UV Index before spending time outdoors and dress appropriately.Download Don’t Fry Day and sun safety posters, sign up for a daily UV Index forecast via email, or check the UV Index online daily on the EPA’s sun safety webpage.
MONTGOMERY, Ala. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $7,830,500 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Alabama while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities. EPA selected seven communities in Alabama to receive seven grants totaling more than $7,830,500 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs.EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more.  “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.” “President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.” “The announcement made by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places. Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities. EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40 percent of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86 percent of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities. State Funding Breakdown: Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program Selection The following organizations in Alabama have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs. Alabama Department of Environmental Management has been selected to receive a $2,000,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to develop a strategic Redevelopment Plan and conduct community engagement activities. The target areas for this grant are the City of York and the Towns of Union Springs and Autaugaville, which have been impacted by an economic shift in the State of Alabama from agriculture to industrial manufacturing.East Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission (EARPDC) has been selected to receive a $1,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds also will be used to prepare a Community Involvement Plan and seven reuse/area-wide plans, create a brownfields site inventory and a prioritization process, and conduct community engagement activities. Assessment activities will occur throughout EARPDC’s 10-county area with a focus on the Talladega Education Gateway, Avondale Mills Village, and Alabama City/Downtown Corridor in Gadsden.The City of Montgomery has been selected to receive a $500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to inventory and prioritize sites, prepare four cleanup and three reuse plans, develop a Community Involvement Plan, and support community engagement activities. Assessment activities will occur in the West Montgomery and Centennial Hill communities. Priority sites include the historic Ben Moore Hotel, two abandoned dry cleaners, and a 3-acre former gas station and auto repair shop.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. Additional Background: EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied. EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award.  To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants Selected for Funding: [link to webpage] To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients: [link to webpage] To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient: [Grow America, in partnership with International City/County Management Association (ICMA).] For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields    ###
ATLANTA, GA. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $5,500,000 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Georgia while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities. EPA selected four communities in Georgia to receive four grants totaling more than $5,500,000 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more.  “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”“Today’s announcement by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40 percent of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86 percent of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Georgia have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.The Columbus Consolidated Government has been selected to receive a $1,000,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to clean up the Bradley Circle Properties, 8.29 acres of land comprised of eight properties: 2838 Bradley Circle, 2 27th Street, 5 27th Street, 9 27th Street, 2711 1st Avenue, 2715 1st Avenue, 2719 1st Avenue, and 2805 1st Avenue.The Middle Georgia Regional Commission has been selected to receive a $1,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to create a thorough site inventory, conduct community engagement activities, and prepare six site reuse and three brownfields revitalization plans. Assessment activities will focus on the Cities of Macon and Milledgeville. The City of Warner Robins has been selected to receive a $1,000,000 multipurpose grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to conduct 19 Phase I and 14 Phase II environmental site assessments; develop an inventory of brownfield sites, prepare a Community Involvement Plan, Brownfields Revitalization Plan, and four site reuse plans; and conduct community engagement activities. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramAdditional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage. ###
TALLAHASSEE, FL. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $8,387,710 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Florida while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected six communities in Florida to receive six grants totaling more than $8,387,710 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. In addition, the agency is announcing $3,500,000 in supplemental funding to one existing, high-performing Brownfields RLF Grant Programs to help expedite their continued work at sites in Florida.EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more. “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”   “Today’s announcement by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.”"We are thrilled that the Environmental Protection Agency has granted East Central Florida Regional Planning Council $1,500,000 for Brownsfield assessment which includes the Downtown Kissimmee CRA/Vine Street Corridor,” said Congressman Soto. “This is not just an investment in cleanup; it's an investment in revitalization, sustainability, and the health of future generations." Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Florida have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs. East Central Florida Regional Planning Council has been selected to receive a $3,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to develop seven cleanup plans and one revitalization plan, and support community engagement activities. Assessment activities will focus on the Cities of Palm Bay, Apopka, Kissimmee, and Melbourne. Priority sites include various vacant and underused properties within the Downtown Apopka Community Redevelopment Area (CRA)/Main Street Corridor, the Downtown Kissimmee CRA/Vine Street Corridor, Melbourne’s Booker Heights community, and Palm Bay’s Coldside community. Hillsborough County has been selected to receive a $1,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to develop site redevelopment strategies and cleanup plans, and support community engagement activities. Assessment activities will focus on three Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Areas along the Interstate-4 corridors in the county: East Lake-Orient Park, University Area, and Ruskin. Priority sites include a 1.93-acre former maintenance yard located in a residential neighborhood, a 2.82-acre abandoned set of mixed-use zoned contiguous lots, and a 2.38-acre former car wash.Wimauma Community Development Corporation has been selected to receive a $500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Community-wide grant funds will be used to develop five cleanup plans and two site reuse plans and to support community engagement activities. The target area for this grant is the Wimauma community within Hillsborough County with a focus on three disadvantaged census tracts.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramThe Agency is announcing $3,500,000 in non-competitive supplemental funding to one successful existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant programs that have already achieved success in their work to clean up and redevelop brownfield sites. RLF Grants provide funding for recipients to offer loans and subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. The funding announced today will help communities continue to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfield sites. The following Florida organizations have been selected to receive non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Program.South Florida Regional Planning Council has been selected to receive $3,500,000. Potential projects highlighted for use of the BIL funding include 1960 NW 27th Avenue in Miami and the old Baltuff Dump on Middle Torch Key. The BIL funding will extend the capacity of the program to provide funding for more cleanups in the most underserved areas in Monroe, Miami-Dade, and Broward Counties.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     ###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $5.5 million in grants from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Houston while advancing environmental justice. These investments, through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs, will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.The Houston Land Bank will receive two grants: an assessment grant for $500,000 and a cleanup grant for $5 million. The assessment grant will be used to inventory sites and conduct three to seven Phase I and nine Phase II environmental site assessments, and to develop two cleanup plans and one reuse plan, and support community engagement activities. The cleanup grant will be used at the former City of Houston Velasco Incinerator Property on N. Velasco Street, which is contaminated with heavy metals, PCBs, volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, and dioxins. Grant funds also will be used to conduct community engagement activities.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “With experience and expertise, partners like the Houston Land Bank are vital to putting EPA’s Brownfields funding to work quickly and effectively,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “With more funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the Land Bank will be able to tackle big projects and make Houston cleaner and healthier for everyone.”“This grant we are announcing resulted from the work of many of us as members of Congress on environmental justice issues. Specifically, the Brownfields Grant Program was funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which is helping communities create safer, cleaner, greener, and more accessible transportation systems. As a member of the House Committee on Budget I have long advocated to bring federal dollars back to the 18th Congressional District and improve the lives of my constituents,” said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18). “I have worked with the Biden Administration on implementing President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which sets a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to communities marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution.  The first Houston Landbank Brownfields Grant, totaling $5,000,000, will be used at the Former Velasco Incinerator Property located in the 18th Congressional District at Zero North Velasco Street in Houston, Texas. This site was an incinerator facility where municipal waste from across the city was burned and is now contaminated with heavy metals and dangerous chemicals. The second Houston Landbank Brownfields Grant, totaling $500,000, will be used to conduct environmental site assessments and develop clean up plans in Houston’s Northeast and East End neighborhoods, which includes Settegast, Kashmere Gardens, and Trinity Gardens. Through my representational work, I led efforts to directly engage the EPA on frontline environmental challenges facing residents of my district. I called a community meeting that brought all sides to a discussion on the creosote contaminations of Fifth Ward and Kashmere Gardens, which led to my work for a cancer study of the impacted area. That study resulted in three reports each revealing a new cancer cluster involving residents of the Fifth Ward and Kashmere Gardens area. I invited EPA Administrator Regan to Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital in the 18th Congressional District to visit the site of a proposed concrete crusher plant that would harm patients and nearby residents. I have brought attention to these issues and I am committed to improve the health and wellbeing of my constituents. In 2023, the EPA launched a historic survey of the impacted areas of the 18th Congressional District to inform the public and the agency on past risk factors for health and safety. Today, this work continues, and it is important that the community participate in this soil sample survey in order for the EPA to collect accurate and complete data. I applaud President Biden and EPA Administrator Regan for joining me in bringing this grant opportunity to the 18th Congressional District and working to improve the environment in areas with the highest need. I will continue to work with the Biden-Harris Administration to address these concerns and engage our community.”  "The Velasco Incinerator Cleanup Project represents a significant step forward in the Houston Land Bank's efforts to transform underutilized and contaminated properties into valuable community assets. We are grateful to the EPA for this funding and the strong support of this project by the local community, the City of Houston, our dedicated team and Board of Directors, and elected officials,” said Christa Stoneham, Chief Executive Officer and President of the Houston Land Bank. “With this collective support, HLB can ensure that we not only meet cleanup objectives and regulatory compliance but also align project outcomes with the community's needs and expectations. We are committed to continuous engagement and transparency throughout this project, ensuring that our efforts lead to long-term benefits for the community.”“The Housing and Community Development Department extends its heartfelt appreciation to the Biden administration for their invaluable assistance in the cleanup of the Velasco Incinerator site,” said Director Michael C. Nichols. “Our environment has a direct influence on our health outcomes. This long-standing hazard in the East End community has finally received the attention it deserves. Thanks to the additional support provided, residents can now rest assured that their safety and well-being are top priorities. HCD is pleased to partner with the Houston Land Bank as it formulates its revitalization strategy for this community."Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.### 
WASHINGTON – Today, May 23, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is issuing its final decision to deny Alabama’s application to run a federally approved state permit program to manage coal ash landfills and impoundments. Following extensive engagement with Alabama and a robust review of its application, the agency is issuing a denial because the state’s permit program is significantly less protective of people and waterways than federal law requires. “EPA is laser focused on protecting people from exposure to pollution, like coal ash, that can cause cancer risks and other serious health issues,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “Our job is to work closely with states to make sure that every community is protected from contamination, and that’s especially true for those that have been overburdened by pollution for too long. EPA stands ready to continue working with Alabama so that they can submit an approvable application and implement a program that is as protective of public health as the federal standards.” Federal law provides protective requirements for public health and the environment at coal ash units (i.e., landfills and surface impoundments) across the country. EPA can approve a state to implement a federally authorized coal ash permit program only if the state provides an equivalent or greater level of protection as federal law. This creates a level playing field for industry and strong, minimum protections for communities, including communities already overburdened by pollution. EPA is denying the Alabama application to implement a coal ash permit program because state permitting decisions do not meet this standard for approval under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under this law, each coal ash unit in the state must achieve compliance with either federal law or state criteria that EPA has determined are at least as protective as the federal criteria. EPA reviewed Alabama’s coal ash permits and found that the permits were significantly less protective than federal law.Under federal regulations, coal ash units cannot be closed in a way that allows coal ash to continue to spread contamination in groundwater after closure. In contrast, Alabama’s permit program does not require that groundwater contamination be adequately addressed during the closure of these coal ash units.Specifically, EPA identified deficiencies in Alabama’s permits with closure requirements for unlined surface impoundments, groundwater monitoring networks, and corrective action (i.e., investigation and clean up) requirements. EPA discussed these issues with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management; however, the state agency has not revised its permits or supplemented its application to demonstrate how such permits are as protective as the federal requirements. To learn more about this denial, visit the Alabama Coal Combustion Residuals Permit Program webpage. EPA solicited comments on the proposal to deny Alabama’s permit program for 60 days, during which EPA held in-person and online public hearings for interested persons to present information and comments about this proposal. BackgroundCoal ash is a byproduct of burning coal in coal-fired power plants that, without proper management, can pollute waterways, groundwater, drinking water and the air. Coal ash contains contaminants like mercury, cadmium, chromium and arsenic associated with cancer and other serious health effects. Preventing and reducing exposures to these contaminants is of particular importance to children’s health as they grow and develop. EPA issued a final rule in April of 2015 regulating coal combustion residuals under RCRA and establishing minimum national standards governing the disposal of CCR from electric utilities in landfills and surface impoundments. At the time the CCR rule was issued, EPA did not have authority under RCRA to approve state permit programs for CCR units. Instead, utilities were responsible for directly implementing the requirements of EPA’s 2015 CCR rule, which were enforceable only through citizen suits. Congress recognized the essential role of the states in its passage of the 2016 Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act. Among other changes, the act amended RCRA to provide EPA with authority to approve state permit programs to operate in lieu of the federal regulations, provided the state requirements meet the federal standards. Applications must provide evidence of permit programs or other systems of prior approval and be as protective as the federal regulations. Once approved, the state permit programs operate in place of the federal program for coal ash disposal.Once states have approved CCR permit programs in place, the WIIN Act contains provisions for how and when states must update their approved programs when changes are made to the CCR requirements at the federal level. EPA encourages states with coal ash facilities to apply to establish their permit programs. Many states have engaged with EPA on how to set up their programs and how their current state regulations could be revised to incorporate the federal requirements. Visit the Permit Programs for CCR webpage for details.
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $2.2 million in grants from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Texas while advancing environmental justice. These investments, through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs, will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the cities of Balcones Heights, Fort Worth, Hamilton and Freeport to receive $1.95 million in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. EPA is also announcing $250,000 in supplemental funding to existing, high-performing Brownfields RLF Grant Programs to expedite their continued work at sites in Dallas.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “Across Texas, cities of all sizes use Brownfields funding to clean up abandoned, contaminated sites that can act as roadblocks to healthy, revitalized neighborhoods,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “With more funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, even more cities, small towns, and rural areas can invest in a clean environment for all residents.” “I’m proud to see the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law I helped pass in 2021 continue to deliver real results for South Texans,” said Rep. Joaquin Castro (TX-20). “This funding will allow Balcones Heights to plan and prepare cleanup of polluted, abandoned properties and pave the way for safer and healthier neighborhoods. Thank you to the EPA for prioritizing South Texas in its efforts to both grow local economies and advance environmental justice in American communities.”"In 2021, I proudly voted for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law that made grants like this one possible,” said Rep. Marc Veasey (TX-33). “These investments will go to fight against pollution, clean our air and water and help create brighter outcomes for communities across North Texas.”“Thanks to this latest investment from the Biden-Harris administration for the City of Dallas, we will be able to convert long-contaminated parts of our community into sites of opportunity for the next generation” said Rep. Jasmine Crockett (TX-30). “By investing the Brownfield Revolving Fund into the heart of Texas, we can now clean up a toxic environment left behind from a legacy of systemic discrimination while simultaneously promoting economic growth through new use of what is the greatest commodities we have today—land. Now more than ever, Dallas needs to build new affordable housing options—but because those with money and power have dumped decades of pollution into our community, we stuck with locations that prevent us from building affordable housing because we know its unsafe to raise children in these polluted environments. With today’s announced investment that builds on a longstanding commitment to environmental justice, the Biden-Harris administration acknowledges the potential our community to thrive when freed from the restraints of poisonous pollution.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Texas have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.The city of Balcones Heights has been selected for a $450,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 14 Phase I and seven Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, prepare two cleanup plans, conduct two visioning sessions, prepare two site reuse assessments and one redevelopment plan, and support community engagement activities. Priority sites include a 2.22-acre site on Fredericksburg Road containing dilapidated commercial buildings that have housed a dry cleaner facility, storage warehouses, and auto repair facilities, and a 0.6-acre former automotive repair store site located on Crossroads Boulevard.The city of Fort Worth will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 30 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, develop four cleanup plans, conduct two visioning sessions, and support community engagement activities. Priority sites include Butler Place, which is an abandoned 42-acre, 400-unit low-income housing residential property, and the former R. Vickery School. The city of Freeport will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to inventory sites and conduct 16 Phase I and nine Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to develop four cleanup plans and two site reuse assessments, and support community engagement activities. Priority sites include a 5.7-acre vacant property that previously housed a medical equipment manufacturing company and has been abandoned since the early 2000s and an 11-acre former railroad yard with abandoned railroad tracks, a building slab, and abandoned trailers. Both sites are within walking distance of the city’s historic downtown.The city of Hamilton will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Cleanup Grant to clean up the Grogan Street Nursing Home located at 400 West Grogan Street. The cleanup site operated as a nursing home from 1960 until 1997 and has sat vacant since then. It is contaminated with inorganic contaminants.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramEPA is announcing $250,000 in non-competitive supplemental funding to successful existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant programs that have already achieved success in their work to clean up and redevelop brownfield sites. RLF Grants provide funding for recipients to offer loans and subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. The funding announced today will help communities continue to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfield sites. In addition to the $1,000,000 in EPA funds already awarded, the city of Dallas Brownfield Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) has been selected to receive an additional $250,000 through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) because it has a high-performing RLF program with significantly depleted funds. Potential projects highlighted for use of the BIL funding include multiple former dry cleaners and multiple properties slated for affordable housing located on Dallas’ Southside. The BIL funding will extend the capacity of the program to provide funding for more cleanups in the most underserved areas in Dallas. To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.### 
COLUMBIA, S.C. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $3,150,770 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in South Carolina while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected two communities in South Carolina to receive two grants totaling more than $3,150,770 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs.EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more.  “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “Today’s announcement by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.” Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40 percent of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86 percent of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in South Carolina have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.The City of Hartsville has been selected to receive a $500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds also will be used to develop four cleanup plans and support reuse planning and community engagement activities. Assessment activities will occur in the Oakdale Neighborhood and College Heights communities within the City of Hartsville.  To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     ###
SAN FRANCISCO —The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced a series of enforcement actions to address deficiencies in safety plans at eight facilities in Arizona, California and Nevada that store or use certain types of chemicals. The Clean Air Act requires facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop and implement risk management plans that identify the potential effects of a chemical accident, steps the facility is taking to prevent an accident, and emergency response procedures should an accident occur. “It’s imperative to the safety of local communities and emergency responders – and it’s the law – that facilities with flammable and toxic chemicals act to prevent accidents and to have proper response procedures in place,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman. “These enforcement actions represent EPA’s commitment to holding accountable facilities that have failed to follow our nation’s critical chemical safety laws.” At the K2 Pure Solutions Nocal facility in Pittsburg, Calif., which manufactures bleach, chlorine, and hydrochloric acid, EPA found significant safety issues during an investigation that began in 2020. These issues included an incomplete documentation of the facility’s pressure relief system, failure to address the safety recommendations in a timely manner and inadequate procedures for testing of emergency response equipment. In August 2021, EPA ordered the facility to address the deficiencies identified during the inspection, which K2 has mostly since done. In April 2024, EPA reached a settlement agreement with K2 that requires the company to pay a $85,189 civil penalty and address remaining deficiencies. That work includes: Replacing instruments in an electrical hazardous area;Moving a chlorine pressure relief device discharge location to a safe location;Completing and implementing the results of a safety study on discharge locations for a dozen safety pressure relief devices;Addressing safety recommendations from recent process hazards analyses;Updating leak repair procedures;Certifying that all critical interlocks and instruments testing is current. Under the agreement, K2 will also provide Contra Costa Health Services with emergency response resources through a supplemental environmental project (SEP). The SEP includes $264,990 in emergency response equipment, including devices for the detection, identification, and quantification of toxic industrial chemicals, and $98,041 in chlorine emergency response training. Both of these projects will provide needed equipment and training for local responders near the K2 facility. EPA also assessed penalties to the following facilities that were late in submitting RMPs: Tolleson Dairy (Tolleson, Ariz.); $2,000 penalty; the facility, which is owned by Kroger Company, processes milk and uses anhydrous ammonia.Holcim Solutions and Products US, LLC (Garden Grove, Calif.): $2,000 penalty; the facility is involved in paint and coating manufacturing and uses toluene diisocyanate.North Brawley Geothermal Project (Brawley, Calif.); $1,600 penalty; the facility is a geothermal electric power generating plant and uses isopentane. City of Pasadena Water and Power (Pasadena, Calif.); $2,000 penalty; the facility is a water treatment plant that uses chlorine. Hazen Nevada Terminal (Hazen, Nev.): $1,600 penalty; the facility is a petroleum bulk terminal owned by South 49 Holdings that stores propane. Carlin Nevada Terminal (Carlin, Nev.): $1,600 penalty; the facility is a petroleum bulk terminal owned by South 49 Holdings that stores propane. PPG Reno DC (McCarran, Nev.): $2,000 penalty; the facility is a chemical distribution center that stores flammable products.Learn about the National Enforcement and Compliance Initiatives on reducing risks of accidental releases at industrial and chemical facilities.Learn about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, and X. 

Texas Climate News

Everything will have to go right to confine atmospheric heating to that desired limit and avoid harsher impacts, climate scientists say. But even coming close to 1.5 C would mean a much better future for life on the planet.
The Texas Tech faculty member, a prominent climate-change researcher and communicator, will also be responsible for the international nonprofit’s “wider portfolio of global climate advocacy and adaptation work.”
State officials’ repeated failure to act on deeply researched advice for averting grid catastrophes paralleled Texas’ years-long non-response to experts’ repeated warnings about the dangers of climate change.
A winter storm warning covered all of Texas on Valentine's Day. Science deniers have cited such episodes to cast doubt on global warming. But extremely cold temperatures still occur in a generally warming world.
2020 basically tied with 2016 as Earth's hottest year on record. Troubling implications for people's health were evident in Texas and many other places. More research underscored health concerns about the climate crisis.
From rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement to canceling the Keystone pipeline to halting leasing in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife refuge, the new administration embarked on a bold turn-around for the country.
Texas regulators have consistently allowed the controversial practice at oil and gas wells, which contributes to manmade climate change. Voters in November rejected a Democratic candidate who called for tougher state regulation.
The period around the Winter Solstice has been an occasion for reflection and celebration for millennia. In recent times, it was also when astronauts took photos of Earth that helped animate planetary consciousness.

Climate Change from EPA

Biden-Harris Administration Announces $2.79 Million in Brownfield Grants Through Investing in America Agenda to Rehabilitate and Revitalize Communities in LouisianaFunded by $1.5 billion investment into Brownfields sites from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to address legacy pollution, advance environmental justice, and create healthier communitiesDALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $2.79 million in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Louisiana while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the cities of Alexandria, Bogalusa and Baker and the Rapides Area Planning Commission for $2.79 million in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “This announcement is a significant step toward revitalizing the community and addressing long-standing environmental and economic challenges. This grant will fund comprehensive environmental site assessments and support the development of cleanup plans, site reuse assessments, a revitalization plan, and a market study, alongside robust community engagement efforts. I was proud to help craft and vote for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law which is delivering unprecedented support to our state. This grant is moving environmental justice forward, promises substantial economic revitalization and improved public health for the residents of Baker, and is fostering a brighter, more sustainable future,” said Congressman Troy A. Carter, Sr. (LA-02).“Louisiana’s many successful Brownfields programs show the variety of ways big cities and small towns can leverage this funding to spur revitalization by cleaning up long-standing sources of contamination,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “Across the state, parishes and cities are making great investments for their residents with EPA’s Brownfields funding.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThese Louisiana organizations have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.· The city of Alexandria has been selected for a $1,290,550 Brownfields Cleanup Grant for the 1-acre former Rush's Cleaners site at 210 Bolton Avenue, which is contaminated with volatile organic contaminants from leaking equipment and associated piping, and improper storage and disposal. Grant funds also will be used to update the city's existing Community Involvement Plan, update the brownfield project website, and conduct other community engagement activities.· The city of Baker will receive a $500,000 for a Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 15 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and evaluate additional sites, prepare four cleanup plans, conduct two site reuse assessments, prepare one revitalization plan and one market study, conduct two visioning sessions, prepare a Community Involvement Plan, and support community engagement. Priority sites include a vacant commercial strip mall and a former filling station and tire shop.· The city of Bogalusa will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 15 Phase I and eight Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, prepare six cleanup plans and one revitalization plan, conduct two site reuse assessments, conduct three visioning sessions, and support other community engagement activities. The grant will target the Poplas Neighborhood, the Terrace Neighborhood, and Richardson Town. Priority sites include seven downtown storefront properties in a state of disrepair and a former restaurant and bar.· The Rapides Area Planning Commission will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 14 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, develop three cleanup plans and one site reuse plan, and support community engagement activities, including the development of a Community Involvement Plan. The target area for this grant is the city of Pineville's Downtown Neighborhood, including a former dry cleaning facility on Main Street, the former Huey P. Long Charity Hospital site, and a former gas station located on Main Street.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $500,000 from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Raton, New Mexico, while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the city of Raton for a Brownfields Community-wide Assessment Grant to conduct 12 Phase I and five Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, prepare cleanup and reuse plans for priority sites and up to six additional sites, and conduct community engagement activities. Priority sites include a nearly 1-acre former family-run market, a 214.5-acre former horse-racing track, and a 6.6-acre former hospital site.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “EPA’s Brownfields funding helps communities of all sizes deal with the environmental and economic burden of abandoned, contaminated properties,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “This grant from President Biden’s historic Investing in America agenda will give Raton a boost to clean up these sites and revitalize their environment while spurring more economic development.”“I’m proud to welcome this important investment that will help clean up abandoned facilities that leak toxic waste and transform them into assets to the community,” said U.S. Senator Ben Ray Luján (NM). “This funding is a win-win for New Mexico by helping the City of Raton enjoy cleaner air and a safer environment while expanding economic opportunities through renovations of these deserted properties.”"This $500,000 investment in Raton for brownfield assessment and cleanup preparation will be welcomed by all local residents,” said Rep. Leger Fernández (NM-03). “This investment, which was made possible by our Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, is a tremendous opportunity for our community to turn abandoned and oftentimes environmentally hazardous sites into thriving business hubs and vibrant community spaces. I look forward to seeing Raton flourish as a result of this funding."  Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $4 million in grants from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Arkansas while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment and the Southwest Arkansas Planning and Development District for more than $3 million total in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. In addition, EPA is announcing $1 million in supplemental funding to existing, high-performing Brownfields RLF Grant Programs to help expedite their continued work at sites in Arkansas.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “The Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment and Southwest Arkansas Planning and Development District have impressive records of getting the most out of Brownfields funding by effectively investing in assessment and cleanup efforts to benefit both urban and rural areas,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “These historic funding amounts from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda will help revitalize more properties and clean up more neighborhoods.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Arkansas have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment has been selected to receive $1 million 15 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to develop five cleanup plans and conduct community engagement activities. Priority sites include five small vacant and dilapidated commercial and residential buildings in downtown Earle; a former auto repair site in the West Memphis Broadway Corridor, and a fire station, a former bulk oil and chemical distribution facility, and the Booker Arts Magnet School in East Little Rock.Southwest Arkansas Planning and Development District, Inc., is receiving $2 million to cleanup wing of the former Warner Brown Hospital in the city of El Dorado. The 2.7-acre cleanup site operated as a hospital and has been vacant since 2015. It is contaminated with heavy metals and inorganic contaminants. Grant funds also will be used to develop a Community Involvement Plan and conduct community engagement activities. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramEPA is announcing $1 million in non-competitive supplemental funding to successful existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant programs that have already achieved success in their work to clean up and redevelop brownfield sites. RLF Grants provide funding for recipients to offer loans and subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. The funding announced today will help communities continue to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfield sites. Pulaski County Brownfields Program has been selected to receive $1 million to help underserved areas in Pulaski County. The RLF program has successfully made loans or subgrants leading to 19 cleanup projects that are either completed or in progress. Potential projects highlighted for use of the BIL funding include the former hotel and job training site and the Godsey Cleaners. The BIL funding will extend the capacity of the program to provide funding for more cleanups in the most underserved areas in Pulaski County.To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.### 
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $1,333,883 from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Cherokee Nation while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the Cherokee Nation for a Brownfields Community-wide Assessment Grant to conduct 25 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to prepare three cleanup plans and one reuse plan and to support community engagement activities. Priority sites include open fields with vegetation in Skiatook, a 2.4-acre developed site with several structures in Bartlesville, the historic Citizen's Bank building and former jail in Marble City, and a 15-acre undeveloped site near a former cold storage plant in Stilwell.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “The Cherokee Nation continues its impressive work to clean up abandoned and contaminated properties to create healthy neighborhoods for their citizens,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “Historic funding amounts from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda are providing more opportunities for Tribes to invest in their own lands, environment, and well-being.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) will receive $18,900,000 to assess the extent of emerging contaminants such as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in public water systems and disadvantaged communities and implement measures to protect communities from these dangerous chemicals. The funding comes from President Biden’s historic Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which has addressed significant pollution issues across the nation. “Clean, safe drinking water is something every person in New Mexico deserves,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “With this funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the New Mexico Environment Department will be able to take crucial steps to safeguard New Mexico’s drinking water from PFAS and other emerging contaminants.” "Contamination and pollution from forever chemicals like PFAS threaten clean drinking water supplies that New Mexico communities depend upon. I am proud to welcome $18.9 million that we secured through the Infrastructure Law to ramp up New Mexico's urgent efforts to detect pollution and protect our precious water resources from PFAS and other emerging contaminants,” said U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich.“I’m proud to welcome this pivotal investment of more than $18 million from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to help New Mexico communities safeguard themselves from PFAS,” said U.S. Senator Ben Ray Luján. “This funding will help examine PFAS levels across the state and implement remediation and mitigation methods to help protect New Mexico's public water system while helping educate New Mexicans on the public health and environmental risks that these chemicals cause."“Combating per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, also known as forever chemicals or PFAS, in our public water systems is essential to provide safe water for communities in New Mexico," said Rep. Melanie Stansbury (NM-01). "Under the Biden Administration, the EPA is working quickly to end the decades of destructive, and sometimes, deadly practices by corporate polluters, and the $18.9 million coming to our state will continue the progress of cleaning up our water systems. New Mexicans know water is life, and they also know the state's Democratic leaders are dedicated to cleaning the water supply for generations to come.”“When clean water flows, New Mexico grows,” said Rep. Teresa Leger Fernández (NM-03). “This $18.9 million EPA award is an investment in the health and safety of New Mexico’s residents. The testing and engineering for PFAS remediation were exactly the kind of projects we envisioned when we passed the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. The Biden Administration knows these projects are essential to protect clean water in our state and help communities who need it most.”NMED will perform sampling of public water systems to assess the extent of PFAS contamination throughout the state. During the sampling process, which the NMED anticipates will take two years to complete, the state will evaluate communities to determine which areas need critical assistance. The NMED will also plan and coordinate outreach efforts for communities during this time. Remediation and mitigation efforts will begin once sampling and evaluation is complete, with an emphasis on small and disadvantaged communities. This funding has a lifespan of five years, with the opportunity for additional funding throughout this time. The five-year workplan includes the identification of PFAS and other emerging contaminants in public water systems, removing all hazardous substances from drinking water sources, and educating communities on how emerging contaminates threaten public health and the environment. The final phase of this funding will be the implementation of plans that assist water systems in maintaining clean water compliance and building resiliency for long-term sustainability.PFAS are a group of manufactured chemicals that have been used in industry and consumer products since the 1940s. Exposure to certain PFAS over a long period of time pose a significant public health risk. The economic and environmental impact of PFAS has already been felt in New Mexico and continues to have an impact nationwide. Through some preliminary testing PFAS has been detected in multiple locations across the state. This funding will allow for more research into the presence of PFAS and other contaminants in source and drinking water. Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.
WASHINGTON – Today, May 23, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Justice announced a settlement valued at over $310 million with Norfolk Southern Railway Company holding the company accountable for addressing and paying for the damage caused by the Feb. 3, 2023 train derailment in East Palestine, Ohio. If the settlement is approved by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, Norfolk Southern will be required to take measures to improve rail safety, pay for health monitoring and mental health services for the surrounding communities, fund long-term environmental monitoring, pay a $15 million civil penalty, and take other actions to protect nearby waterways and drinking water resources. Together with other response costs and rail safety enhancements, Norfolk Southern estimates that it will spend more than $1 billion to address the contamination and other harms caused by the East Palestine derailment and improve rail safety and operations.In the hours following the derailment, EPA personnel arrived on site, and they have remained there to ensure that the people of East Palestine are protected and have the most up-to-date information. In those early days, EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan promised that Norfolk Southern would be held accountable for its actions. Since then, as EPA and DOJ pursued a strong enforcement action to deliver on that commitment, EPA has continued to stay engaged in the community, directing cleanup activities, collecting air, water and soil samples, and participating in community meetings. The Administration has led a robust, multi-agency effort—including the Department of Transportation, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Department of Health and Human Services—to fulfill President Biden’s commitment to “supporting the people of East Palestine and all those affected in surrounding areas of Ohio and Pennsylvania every step of the way.”“No community should have to experience the trauma inflicted upon the residents of East Palestine,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why President Biden pledged from the beginning that his Administration would stand with the community every step of the way. Today’s enforcement action delivers on this commitment, ensures the cleanup is paid for by the company, and helps prevent another disaster like this from happening again. Because of this settlement, residents and first responders will have greater access to health services, trains will be safer and waterways will be cleaner.”“The President issued an executive order which promised to address the disaster’s long-term effects and to hold Norfolk Southern responsible for its train derailing and the burning of hazardous chemicals in East Palestine. This settlement helps fulfill that promise,” said Acting Associate Attorney General Benjamin C. Mizer. “Importantly, those who will most directly benefit from this settlement are those who were most directly affected by the disaster. And the rail safety commitments will help prevent future catastrophic railway events.”Today’s settlement follows a complaint filed by the United States against Norfolk Southern in March 2023 for unlawful discharges of pollutants and hazardous substances caused by the train derailment. In February 2023, EPA issued a unilateral administrative order, holding Norfolk Southern accountable for the damage done to the community. The order required cleanup of spilled substances and impacted soils, as well as payment of all costs to the U.S. government. EPA also issued an order under the Clean Water Act to clean up oil spilled into the surrounding waterways. Since then, EPA has been directing and overseeing the extensive cleanup activities. In total, Norfolk Southern estimates that it will spend more than $1 billion to address the contamination caused by the East Palestine derailment and improve rail safety and operations, which includes this settlement with the United States valued at over $310 million, as well as around $780 million in environmental response costs incurred by Norfolk Southern. Norfolk Southern has estimated its costs since the derailment will exceed $200 million in rail safety enhancements, including those required by this settlement.To help ensure that no community goes through what East Palestine residents have faced, the settlement also requires Norfolk Southern to improve coordination with government officials and other stakeholders during emergency responses. Specifically, Norfolk Southern will create and adopt a procedure for coordinating with first responders and government officials, where appropriate, before restoring and reopening tracks for use after a derailment involving spilled hazardous material. Norfolk Southern will also create and adopt a procedure for coordinating with government officials and other stakeholders in advance of any vent and burn proposed by the company.Under the settlement, Norfolk Southern has agreed to:Spend an estimated $235 million for all past and future costs, so that cleanup efforts can continue and the company, rather than taxpayers, covers the cost.Pay a $15 million civil penalty to resolve the alleged violations of the Clean Water Act.Pay $25 million for a 20-year community health program that includes medical monitoring for qualified individuals and mental health services for individuals residing in affected counties – including those in Pennsylvania – as well as first responders who worked at the site, and a community facilitation plan to assist community members in using the benefits of the program.Spend approximately $15 million to implement long-term monitoring of groundwater and surface water for a period of 10 years.Pay $15 million for a private drinking water monitoring fund that will continue the existing private drinking water well monitoring program for 10 years.Implement a “waterways remediation plan,” with an estimated budget of $6 million, for projects in Leslie Run and Sulphur Run that will prioritize addressing historical pollution, reducing non-point source pollution through infrastructure upgrades and stormwater management projects, and restoring aquatic and riparian habitat.Pay $175,000 for natural resource damages, to be used by the United States to restore, rehabilitate, replace, or acquire the equivalent of the natural resources injured as a result of the derailment. In addition, the consent decree requires Norfolk Southern to undertake projects to improve the safety of transporting hazardous materials by rail, which will include installation of additional devices to detect overheated wheel bearings early enough to prevent derailments like the one that happened in East Palestine. All told, Norfolk Southern has estimated its costs dating from the derailment will exceed $200 million in rail safety enhancements.The proposed settlement, lodged in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, is subject to a minimum 30-day public comment period and final court approval. The details of today’s settlement are available on the Justice Department’s website.Additional BackgroundEPA is committed to protecting the health and safety of East Palestine and surrounding communities. EPA personnel have been on site since the initial hours of the train derailment, and the agency continues to provide residents the most up-to-date information via the website, welcome center, community meetings, newsletters and more. Immediately following the train derailment, EPA established a 24/7 air monitoring and sampling network. EPA also began coordinating with state and local officials to monitor environmental impacts on the community. Over the course of the response, EPA has collected over 115 million air monitoring data points and over 45,000 air, water and soil samples, giving the agency confidence in the safety of air, water and soil in the community. Since the evacuation was lifted, no sustained chemicals of concern have been found in the air.To date, more than 177,000 tons of contaminated soil and more than 69 million gallons of wastewater have been removed from the community and work continues to remove contamination from area creeks and soil sampling at the derailment site to ensure all contamination has been remediated.
WASHINGTON – Today, May 24, the Friday before the Memorial Day weekend, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, along with the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention, is recognizing the 16th annual “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage Americans to take a few simple steps to protect their skin and eye health while outdoors. Overexposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun can increase the risk of developing skin cancer and cataracts, so it is important to be aware of the strength of the sun’s UV rays and take simple steps to protect your skin and eyes while outdoors. “Remember to protect your skin and eyes from UV rays before you go outdoors,” said Joseph Goffman, Assistant Administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation. “Don’t Fry Day is a great annual reminder of the importance of sun safety, and you can use the EPA’s UV Index app to get the UV forecast for your location and tips on how to be sun safe.”  Almost 20% of Americans will develop skin cancer. Since many skin cancer cases are caused by overexposure to UV radiation, protecting your skin outdoors is an important step to reducing your skin cancer risk. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2024, more than 100,600 new cases of invasive melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, will be diagnosed in the United States. This is approximately 3,000 more cases than were estimated in 2023.All people are equally at risk of eye damage and developing cataracts, but some people may be at greater risk of contracting skin cancer depending on the color of their skin, a history of blistering sunburns in early childhood, the presence of many moles, or a family history of skin cancer. Also, although sun safety is especially important in summer when we spend more time outdoors, UV can be high throughout the year depending on factors such as location, elevation, and reflective surfaces like sand and snow. The EPA, the National Weather Service, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work together to make the UV Index forecast available in the United States. The EPA’s UV Index app (search for the EPA’s UV Index in the App Store and on Google Play) is a convenient tool to let you know the strength of the sun’s skin cancer-causing UV rays. The app gives daily and hourly UV intensity forecasts for your location, provides recommendations on sun safety, and is also available in Spanish. Reduce your risk of skin cancer and eye damage by remembering to:SLIP! – Slip on a long-sleeved shirt or other clothing that covers your skin.SLOP! – Slop on a handful of sunscreen with sun protection factor 15 or higher, and re-apply every two hours, or sooner if in the water.SLAP! – Slap on a broad-brimmed hat to cover the back of your neck and the tips of your ears.WRAP! – Wrap on a pair of sunglasses. The kind that wrap around the sides of your face provide more sun protection.Avoid tanning beds and minimize sunbathing.Check the UV Index before spending time outdoors and dress appropriately.Download Don’t Fry Day and sun safety posters, sign up for a daily UV Index forecast via email, or check the UV Index online daily on the EPA’s sun safety webpage.
MONTGOMERY, Ala. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $7,830,500 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Alabama while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities. EPA selected seven communities in Alabama to receive seven grants totaling more than $7,830,500 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs.EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more.  “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.” “President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.” “The announcement made by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places. Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities. EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40 percent of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86 percent of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities. State Funding Breakdown: Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program Selection The following organizations in Alabama have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs. Alabama Department of Environmental Management has been selected to receive a $2,000,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to develop a strategic Redevelopment Plan and conduct community engagement activities. The target areas for this grant are the City of York and the Towns of Union Springs and Autaugaville, which have been impacted by an economic shift in the State of Alabama from agriculture to industrial manufacturing.East Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission (EARPDC) has been selected to receive a $1,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds also will be used to prepare a Community Involvement Plan and seven reuse/area-wide plans, create a brownfields site inventory and a prioritization process, and conduct community engagement activities. Assessment activities will occur throughout EARPDC’s 10-county area with a focus on the Talladega Education Gateway, Avondale Mills Village, and Alabama City/Downtown Corridor in Gadsden.The City of Montgomery has been selected to receive a $500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to inventory and prioritize sites, prepare four cleanup and three reuse plans, develop a Community Involvement Plan, and support community engagement activities. Assessment activities will occur in the West Montgomery and Centennial Hill communities. Priority sites include the historic Ben Moore Hotel, two abandoned dry cleaners, and a 3-acre former gas station and auto repair shop.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. Additional Background: EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied. EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award.  To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants Selected for Funding: [link to webpage] To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients: [link to webpage] To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient: [Grow America, in partnership with International City/County Management Association (ICMA).] For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program: https://www.epa.gov/brownfields    ###
ATLANTA, GA. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $5,500,000 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Georgia while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities. EPA selected four communities in Georgia to receive four grants totaling more than $5,500,000 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more.  “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”“Today’s announcement by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40 percent of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86 percent of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Georgia have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.The Columbus Consolidated Government has been selected to receive a $1,000,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to clean up the Bradley Circle Properties, 8.29 acres of land comprised of eight properties: 2838 Bradley Circle, 2 27th Street, 5 27th Street, 9 27th Street, 2711 1st Avenue, 2715 1st Avenue, 2719 1st Avenue, and 2805 1st Avenue.The Middle Georgia Regional Commission has been selected to receive a $1,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to create a thorough site inventory, conduct community engagement activities, and prepare six site reuse and three brownfields revitalization plans. Assessment activities will focus on the Cities of Macon and Milledgeville. The City of Warner Robins has been selected to receive a $1,000,000 multipurpose grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to conduct 19 Phase I and 14 Phase II environmental site assessments; develop an inventory of brownfield sites, prepare a Community Involvement Plan, Brownfields Revitalization Plan, and four site reuse plans; and conduct community engagement activities. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramAdditional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage. ###
TALLAHASSEE, FL. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $8,387,710 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Florida while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected six communities in Florida to receive six grants totaling more than $8,387,710 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. In addition, the agency is announcing $3,500,000 in supplemental funding to one existing, high-performing Brownfields RLF Grant Programs to help expedite their continued work at sites in Florida.EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more. “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”   “Today’s announcement by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.”"We are thrilled that the Environmental Protection Agency has granted East Central Florida Regional Planning Council $1,500,000 for Brownsfield assessment which includes the Downtown Kissimmee CRA/Vine Street Corridor,” said Congressman Soto. “This is not just an investment in cleanup; it's an investment in revitalization, sustainability, and the health of future generations." Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Florida have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs. East Central Florida Regional Planning Council has been selected to receive a $3,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to develop seven cleanup plans and one revitalization plan, and support community engagement activities. Assessment activities will focus on the Cities of Palm Bay, Apopka, Kissimmee, and Melbourne. Priority sites include various vacant and underused properties within the Downtown Apopka Community Redevelopment Area (CRA)/Main Street Corridor, the Downtown Kissimmee CRA/Vine Street Corridor, Melbourne’s Booker Heights community, and Palm Bay’s Coldside community. Hillsborough County has been selected to receive a $1,500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds will be used to develop site redevelopment strategies and cleanup plans, and support community engagement activities. Assessment activities will focus on three Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Areas along the Interstate-4 corridors in the county: East Lake-Orient Park, University Area, and Ruskin. Priority sites include a 1.93-acre former maintenance yard located in a residential neighborhood, a 2.82-acre abandoned set of mixed-use zoned contiguous lots, and a 2.38-acre former car wash.Wimauma Community Development Corporation has been selected to receive a $500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Community-wide grant funds will be used to develop five cleanup plans and two site reuse plans and to support community engagement activities. The target area for this grant is the Wimauma community within Hillsborough County with a focus on three disadvantaged census tracts.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramThe Agency is announcing $3,500,000 in non-competitive supplemental funding to one successful existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant programs that have already achieved success in their work to clean up and redevelop brownfield sites. RLF Grants provide funding for recipients to offer loans and subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. The funding announced today will help communities continue to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfield sites. The following Florida organizations have been selected to receive non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Program.South Florida Regional Planning Council has been selected to receive $3,500,000. Potential projects highlighted for use of the BIL funding include 1960 NW 27th Avenue in Miami and the old Baltuff Dump on Middle Torch Key. The BIL funding will extend the capacity of the program to provide funding for more cleanups in the most underserved areas in Monroe, Miami-Dade, and Broward Counties.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     ###
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $5.5 million in grants from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Houston while advancing environmental justice. These investments, through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs, will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.The Houston Land Bank will receive two grants: an assessment grant for $500,000 and a cleanup grant for $5 million. The assessment grant will be used to inventory sites and conduct three to seven Phase I and nine Phase II environmental site assessments, and to develop two cleanup plans and one reuse plan, and support community engagement activities. The cleanup grant will be used at the former City of Houston Velasco Incinerator Property on N. Velasco Street, which is contaminated with heavy metals, PCBs, volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile organic compounds, and dioxins. Grant funds also will be used to conduct community engagement activities.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “With experience and expertise, partners like the Houston Land Bank are vital to putting EPA’s Brownfields funding to work quickly and effectively,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “With more funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the Land Bank will be able to tackle big projects and make Houston cleaner and healthier for everyone.”“This grant we are announcing resulted from the work of many of us as members of Congress on environmental justice issues. Specifically, the Brownfields Grant Program was funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which is helping communities create safer, cleaner, greener, and more accessible transportation systems. As a member of the House Committee on Budget I have long advocated to bring federal dollars back to the 18th Congressional District and improve the lives of my constituents,” said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18). “I have worked with the Biden Administration on implementing President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative, which sets a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to communities marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution.  The first Houston Landbank Brownfields Grant, totaling $5,000,000, will be used at the Former Velasco Incinerator Property located in the 18th Congressional District at Zero North Velasco Street in Houston, Texas. This site was an incinerator facility where municipal waste from across the city was burned and is now contaminated with heavy metals and dangerous chemicals. The second Houston Landbank Brownfields Grant, totaling $500,000, will be used to conduct environmental site assessments and develop clean up plans in Houston’s Northeast and East End neighborhoods, which includes Settegast, Kashmere Gardens, and Trinity Gardens. Through my representational work, I led efforts to directly engage the EPA on frontline environmental challenges facing residents of my district. I called a community meeting that brought all sides to a discussion on the creosote contaminations of Fifth Ward and Kashmere Gardens, which led to my work for a cancer study of the impacted area. That study resulted in three reports each revealing a new cancer cluster involving residents of the Fifth Ward and Kashmere Gardens area. I invited EPA Administrator Regan to Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital in the 18th Congressional District to visit the site of a proposed concrete crusher plant that would harm patients and nearby residents. I have brought attention to these issues and I am committed to improve the health and wellbeing of my constituents. In 2023, the EPA launched a historic survey of the impacted areas of the 18th Congressional District to inform the public and the agency on past risk factors for health and safety. Today, this work continues, and it is important that the community participate in this soil sample survey in order for the EPA to collect accurate and complete data. I applaud President Biden and EPA Administrator Regan for joining me in bringing this grant opportunity to the 18th Congressional District and working to improve the environment in areas with the highest need. I will continue to work with the Biden-Harris Administration to address these concerns and engage our community.”  "The Velasco Incinerator Cleanup Project represents a significant step forward in the Houston Land Bank's efforts to transform underutilized and contaminated properties into valuable community assets. We are grateful to the EPA for this funding and the strong support of this project by the local community, the City of Houston, our dedicated team and Board of Directors, and elected officials,” said Christa Stoneham, Chief Executive Officer and President of the Houston Land Bank. “With this collective support, HLB can ensure that we not only meet cleanup objectives and regulatory compliance but also align project outcomes with the community's needs and expectations. We are committed to continuous engagement and transparency throughout this project, ensuring that our efforts lead to long-term benefits for the community.”“The Housing and Community Development Department extends its heartfelt appreciation to the Biden administration for their invaluable assistance in the cleanup of the Velasco Incinerator site,” said Director Michael C. Nichols. “Our environment has a direct influence on our health outcomes. This long-standing hazard in the East End community has finally received the attention it deserves. Thanks to the additional support provided, residents can now rest assured that their safety and well-being are top priorities. HCD is pleased to partner with the Houston Land Bank as it formulates its revitalization strategy for this community."Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.### 
WASHINGTON – Today, May 23, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is issuing its final decision to deny Alabama’s application to run a federally approved state permit program to manage coal ash landfills and impoundments. Following extensive engagement with Alabama and a robust review of its application, the agency is issuing a denial because the state’s permit program is significantly less protective of people and waterways than federal law requires. “EPA is laser focused on protecting people from exposure to pollution, like coal ash, that can cause cancer risks and other serious health issues,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “Our job is to work closely with states to make sure that every community is protected from contamination, and that’s especially true for those that have been overburdened by pollution for too long. EPA stands ready to continue working with Alabama so that they can submit an approvable application and implement a program that is as protective of public health as the federal standards.” Federal law provides protective requirements for public health and the environment at coal ash units (i.e., landfills and surface impoundments) across the country. EPA can approve a state to implement a federally authorized coal ash permit program only if the state provides an equivalent or greater level of protection as federal law. This creates a level playing field for industry and strong, minimum protections for communities, including communities already overburdened by pollution. EPA is denying the Alabama application to implement a coal ash permit program because state permitting decisions do not meet this standard for approval under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under this law, each coal ash unit in the state must achieve compliance with either federal law or state criteria that EPA has determined are at least as protective as the federal criteria. EPA reviewed Alabama’s coal ash permits and found that the permits were significantly less protective than federal law.Under federal regulations, coal ash units cannot be closed in a way that allows coal ash to continue to spread contamination in groundwater after closure. In contrast, Alabama’s permit program does not require that groundwater contamination be adequately addressed during the closure of these coal ash units.Specifically, EPA identified deficiencies in Alabama’s permits with closure requirements for unlined surface impoundments, groundwater monitoring networks, and corrective action (i.e., investigation and clean up) requirements. EPA discussed these issues with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management; however, the state agency has not revised its permits or supplemented its application to demonstrate how such permits are as protective as the federal requirements. To learn more about this denial, visit the Alabama Coal Combustion Residuals Permit Program webpage. EPA solicited comments on the proposal to deny Alabama’s permit program for 60 days, during which EPA held in-person and online public hearings for interested persons to present information and comments about this proposal. BackgroundCoal ash is a byproduct of burning coal in coal-fired power plants that, without proper management, can pollute waterways, groundwater, drinking water and the air. Coal ash contains contaminants like mercury, cadmium, chromium and arsenic associated with cancer and other serious health effects. Preventing and reducing exposures to these contaminants is of particular importance to children’s health as they grow and develop. EPA issued a final rule in April of 2015 regulating coal combustion residuals under RCRA and establishing minimum national standards governing the disposal of CCR from electric utilities in landfills and surface impoundments. At the time the CCR rule was issued, EPA did not have authority under RCRA to approve state permit programs for CCR units. Instead, utilities were responsible for directly implementing the requirements of EPA’s 2015 CCR rule, which were enforceable only through citizen suits. Congress recognized the essential role of the states in its passage of the 2016 Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act. Among other changes, the act amended RCRA to provide EPA with authority to approve state permit programs to operate in lieu of the federal regulations, provided the state requirements meet the federal standards. Applications must provide evidence of permit programs or other systems of prior approval and be as protective as the federal regulations. Once approved, the state permit programs operate in place of the federal program for coal ash disposal.Once states have approved CCR permit programs in place, the WIIN Act contains provisions for how and when states must update their approved programs when changes are made to the CCR requirements at the federal level. EPA encourages states with coal ash facilities to apply to establish their permit programs. Many states have engaged with EPA on how to set up their programs and how their current state regulations could be revised to incorporate the federal requirements. Visit the Permit Programs for CCR webpage for details.
DALLAS, TEXAS (May 23, 2024)  –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $2.2 million in grants from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in Texas while advancing environmental justice. These investments, through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs, will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected the cities of Balcones Heights, Fort Worth, Hamilton and Freeport to receive $1.95 million in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs. EPA is also announcing $250,000 in supplemental funding to existing, high-performing Brownfields RLF Grant Programs to expedite their continued work at sites in Dallas.“Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “Across Texas, cities of all sizes use Brownfields funding to clean up abandoned, contaminated sites that can act as roadblocks to healthy, revitalized neighborhoods,” said Regional Administrator Dr. Earthea Nance. “With more funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, even more cities, small towns, and rural areas can invest in a clean environment for all residents.” “I’m proud to see the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law I helped pass in 2021 continue to deliver real results for South Texans,” said Rep. Joaquin Castro (TX-20). “This funding will allow Balcones Heights to plan and prepare cleanup of polluted, abandoned properties and pave the way for safer and healthier neighborhoods. Thank you to the EPA for prioritizing South Texas in its efforts to both grow local economies and advance environmental justice in American communities.”"In 2021, I proudly voted for the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law that made grants like this one possible,” said Rep. Marc Veasey (TX-33). “These investments will go to fight against pollution, clean our air and water and help create brighter outcomes for communities across North Texas.”“Thanks to this latest investment from the Biden-Harris administration for the City of Dallas, we will be able to convert long-contaminated parts of our community into sites of opportunity for the next generation” said Rep. Jasmine Crockett (TX-30). “By investing the Brownfield Revolving Fund into the heart of Texas, we can now clean up a toxic environment left behind from a legacy of systemic discrimination while simultaneously promoting economic growth through new use of what is the greatest commodities we have today—land. Now more than ever, Dallas needs to build new affordable housing options—but because those with money and power have dumped decades of pollution into our community, we stuck with locations that prevent us from building affordable housing because we know its unsafe to raise children in these polluted environments. With today’s announced investment that builds on a longstanding commitment to environmental justice, the Biden-Harris administration acknowledges the potential our community to thrive when freed from the restraints of poisonous pollution.”Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40% of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86% of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in Texas have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.The city of Balcones Heights has been selected for a $450,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 14 Phase I and seven Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, prepare two cleanup plans, conduct two visioning sessions, prepare two site reuse assessments and one redevelopment plan, and support community engagement activities. Priority sites include a 2.22-acre site on Fredericksburg Road containing dilapidated commercial buildings that have housed a dry cleaner facility, storage warehouses, and auto repair facilities, and a 0.6-acre former automotive repair store site located on Crossroads Boulevard.The city of Fort Worth will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to conduct 30 Phase I and 10 Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to identify and prioritize additional sites, develop four cleanup plans, conduct two visioning sessions, and support community engagement activities. Priority sites include Butler Place, which is an abandoned 42-acre, 400-unit low-income housing residential property, and the former R. Vickery School. The city of Freeport will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant to inventory sites and conduct 16 Phase I and nine Phase II environmental site assessments. Grant funds also will be used to develop four cleanup plans and two site reuse assessments, and support community engagement activities. Priority sites include a 5.7-acre vacant property that previously housed a medical equipment manufacturing company and has been abandoned since the early 2000s and an 11-acre former railroad yard with abandoned railroad tracks, a building slab, and abandoned trailers. Both sites are within walking distance of the city’s historic downtown.The city of Hamilton will receive a $500,000 Brownfields Cleanup Grant to clean up the Grogan Street Nursing Home located at 400 West Grogan Street. The cleanup site operated as a nursing home from 1960 until 1997 and has sat vacant since then. It is contaminated with inorganic contaminants.To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Non-competitive Supplemental Funding Through the Existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant ProgramEPA is announcing $250,000 in non-competitive supplemental funding to successful existing Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant programs that have already achieved success in their work to clean up and redevelop brownfield sites. RLF Grants provide funding for recipients to offer loans and subgrants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites. The funding announced today will help communities continue to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfield sites. In addition to the $1,000,000 in EPA funds already awarded, the city of Dallas Brownfield Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) has been selected to receive an additional $250,000 through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) because it has a high-performing RLF program with significantly depleted funds. Potential projects highlighted for use of the BIL funding include multiple former dry cleaners and multiple properties slated for affordable housing located on Dallas’ Southside. The BIL funding will extend the capacity of the program to provide funding for more cleanups in the most underserved areas in Dallas. To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     Connect with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 on Facebook, X (formerly known as Twitter), or visit our homepage.### 
COLUMBIA, S.C. – On May 20, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $3,150,770 in grant awards from President Biden’s Investing in America agenda to expedite the assessment and cleanup of brownfield sites in South Carolina while advancing environmental justice. These investments through EPA’s Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) Grant Programs will help transform once-polluted, vacant, and abandoned properties into community assets, while helping to create good jobs and spur economic revitalization in overburdened communities.EPA selected two communities in South Carolina to receive two grants totaling more than $3,150,770 in competitive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant programs.EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan will announce the awards in Philadelphia today alongside Philadelphia Mayor Cherelle Parker and U.S. Representative Mary Gay Scanlon (PA-05) at a local brownfield side near Bartram’s Mile. For over 60 years, the site was used as an oil terminal, filled with storage tanks full of petroleum and other semi-volatile organic compounds. The City of Philadelphia has been working to reclaim brownfield sites along Bartram’s Mile, turning them into a community hub where residents can access trails for hiking and biking, as well as areas for fishing, gardening, farming and more.  “Far too many communities across America have suffered the harmful economic and health consequences of living near polluted brownfield sites,” said President Joe Biden. “I've long believed that people who’ve borne the burden of pollution should be the first to see the benefits of new investment. Under my Administration, we are making that a reality by ensuring the historic resources from my Investing in America agenda reach communities that need it most. I am proud that my Administration is helping Philadelphia clean up and transform this area into an economic engine, while tackling a longstanding environmental injustice and creating good-paying jobs.”“President Biden sees contaminated sites and blighted areas as an opportunity to invest in healthier, revitalized communities,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “That’s why he secured historic funding under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, supercharging EPA’s Brownfields program to clean up contaminated properties in overburdened communities and bring them back into productive use.”  “Today’s announcement by President Biden and Administrator Regan reflect this administration’s commitment to ensure that benefits of certain Federal climate, clean energy, affordable and sustainable housing, and other investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution,” said Acting Regional Administrator Jeaneanne Gettle. “We are excited about the potential of these brownfields grants to provide jobs while cleaning up blighted areas of these communities and promoting public health and a cleaner environment.” Many communities that are under economic stress, particularly those located in areas that have experienced long periods of disinvestment, lack the resources needed to initiate brownfield cleanup and redevelopment projects. As brownfield sites are transformed into community assets, they attract jobs, promote economic revitalization, and transform communities into sustainable and environmentally just places.Thanks to the historic $1.5 billion boost from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA’s Brownfields Program is helping more communities than ever before begin to address the economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields and stimulate economic opportunity, and environmental revitalization in historically overburdened communities.EPA’s Brownfields Program advances President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative which set a goal that 40 percent of the overall benefits of certain Federal investments flow to disadvantaged communities that are marginalized by underinvestment and overburdened by pollution. The Brownfields Program strives to meet this commitment and advance environmental justice and equity considerations in all aspects of its work. Approximately 86 percent of the MAC and RLF Supplemental program applications selected to receive funding proposed to work in areas that include disadvantaged communities.State Funding Breakdown:Brownfields Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Program SelectionThe following organizations in South Carolina have been selected to receive EPA Brownfields funding through the Multipurpose, Assessment, and Cleanup (MAC) Grant Programs.The City of Hartsville has been selected to receive a $500,000 assessment grant from EPA. Grant funds also will be used to develop four cleanup plans and support reuse planning and community engagement activities. Assessment activities will occur in the Oakdale Neighborhood and College Heights communities within the City of Hartsville.  To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.Additional Background:EPA has selected these organizations to receive funding to address and support the reuse of brownfield sites to address the health, economic, social, and environmental challenges caused by brownfields. EPA anticipates making all the awards announced today once all legal and administrative requirements are satisfied.EPA’s Brownfields Program began in 1995 and has provided nearly $2.7 billion in Brownfield Grants to assess and clean up contaminated properties and return blighted properties to productive reuse. Prior to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, this program made approximately $60 million available each year. Thanks to the President’s historic investments in America through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, EPA has now increased that yearly investment nearly 400 percent. More than half of the funding available for this grant cycle (approximately $160 million) comes from the historic $1.5 billion investment from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This investment has also allowed the MAC grants’ maximum award amounts to increase significantly from $500,000 to a new maximum of $5 million per award. To see the list of the FY 2024 Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup applicants selected for funding visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage.  To see the list of RLF Supplemental funding recipients visit EPA’s FY 2024  Multipurpose, Assessment and Cleanup Applicants webpage. To learn more about RLF Technical Assistance grant recipient visit EPA’s Brownfields Grow America webpage.  For more information on EPA’s Brownfields Program visit EPA’s Brownfields webpage.     ###
SAN FRANCISCO —The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced a series of enforcement actions to address deficiencies in safety plans at eight facilities in Arizona, California and Nevada that store or use certain types of chemicals. The Clean Air Act requires facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop and implement risk management plans that identify the potential effects of a chemical accident, steps the facility is taking to prevent an accident, and emergency response procedures should an accident occur. “It’s imperative to the safety of local communities and emergency responders – and it’s the law – that facilities with flammable and toxic chemicals act to prevent accidents and to have proper response procedures in place,” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman. “These enforcement actions represent EPA’s commitment to holding accountable facilities that have failed to follow our nation’s critical chemical safety laws.” At the K2 Pure Solutions Nocal facility in Pittsburg, Calif., which manufactures bleach, chlorine, and hydrochloric acid, EPA found significant safety issues during an investigation that began in 2020. These issues included an incomplete documentation of the facility’s pressure relief system, failure to address the safety recommendations in a timely manner and inadequate procedures for testing of emergency response equipment. In August 2021, EPA ordered the facility to address the deficiencies identified during the inspection, which K2 has mostly since done. In April 2024, EPA reached a settlement agreement with K2 that requires the company to pay a $85,189 civil penalty and address remaining deficiencies. That work includes: Replacing instruments in an electrical hazardous area;Moving a chlorine pressure relief device discharge location to a safe location;Completing and implementing the results of a safety study on discharge locations for a dozen safety pressure relief devices;Addressing safety recommendations from recent process hazards analyses;Updating leak repair procedures;Certifying that all critical interlocks and instruments testing is current. Under the agreement, K2 will also provide Contra Costa Health Services with emergency response resources through a supplemental environmental project (SEP). The SEP includes $264,990 in emergency response equipment, including devices for the detection, identification, and quantification of toxic industrial chemicals, and $98,041 in chlorine emergency response training. Both of these projects will provide needed equipment and training for local responders near the K2 facility. EPA also assessed penalties to the following facilities that were late in submitting RMPs: Tolleson Dairy (Tolleson, Ariz.); $2,000 penalty; the facility, which is owned by Kroger Company, processes milk and uses anhydrous ammonia.Holcim Solutions and Products US, LLC (Garden Grove, Calif.): $2,000 penalty; the facility is involved in paint and coating manufacturing and uses toluene diisocyanate.North Brawley Geothermal Project (Brawley, Calif.); $1,600 penalty; the facility is a geothermal electric power generating plant and uses isopentane. City of Pasadena Water and Power (Pasadena, Calif.); $2,000 penalty; the facility is a water treatment plant that uses chlorine. Hazen Nevada Terminal (Hazen, Nev.): $1,600 penalty; the facility is a petroleum bulk terminal owned by South 49 Holdings that stores propane. Carlin Nevada Terminal (Carlin, Nev.): $1,600 penalty; the facility is a petroleum bulk terminal owned by South 49 Holdings that stores propane. PPG Reno DC (McCarran, Nev.): $2,000 penalty; the facility is a chemical distribution center that stores flammable products.Learn about the National Enforcement and Compliance Initiatives on reducing risks of accidental releases at industrial and chemical facilities.Learn about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, and X. 

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